The Immaculate Conception – O Purest of Creatures – Sweet Star of the Sea

This site contains offensive ads. Please view this page at
http://www.sing-prayer.org/p/97
or
go to
http://www.sing-prayer.org/.



Click the Button to sing the prayer, or play the song in a New Window

O Purest of Creatures – Sweet Star of the Sea
Fr. Frederick William Faber, (1814-1863) St. Denio
1. O purest of creatures,
sweet Mother! sweet Maid!
The one spotless womb wherein
Jesus was laid!
Dark night hath come down on us,
Mother! And we,
Look out for thy shining, sweet
Star of the Sea!
2. Deep night has come down on this
rough-spoken world,
&-the banners of darkness are
boldly unfurled;
&-the tempest tossed Church—
all her eyes are on thee,
They look to thy shining, sweet
Star of the Sea!
3. He gazed on thy soul; it was
spotless and fair;
For-the empire of sin—it had
never been there;
None had ever owned thee, dear
Mother! But He,
And-He blessed thy clear shining, sweet
Star of the Sea!
4. Earth gave Him one lodging; ‘twas
deep in thy breast,
And God found a home where the
sinner finds rest;
His home and His hiding place
both were in thee,
He-was won by thy shining, sweet
Star of the Sea.
5. O blissful and calm was the
wonderful rest,
That-thou gavest thy God in thy
virginal breast;
For-the heaven He left, He found
heaven in thee,
And-He shone in thy shining, sweet
Star of the Sea!
6. To sinners what comfort, to
angels what mirth,
That God found one creature un-
fallen on earth,
One spot where His Spirit, un-
troubled could be,
The depth of thy shining, sweet
Star of the Sea!
7. O shine on us brighter than
even, then shine,
For-the highest of honours, dear
Mother! Is thine;
“Conceived without sin,” thy chaste
title e’re be,
Clear light from thy birth-spring, sweet
Star of the Sea!
8. So worship we God in these
rude latter days;
So worship we Jesus our
Love, when we praise,
His wonderful grace in the
gifts He gave thee,
The gift of clear shining, sweet
Star of the Sea!
9. Deep night hath come down on us,
Mother! Deep night,
And-we need more than ever the
guide of thy light;
For-the darker the night is the
brighter should be,
Thy beautiful shining, sweet
Star of the Sea!
Amen.


The Blessed Virgin said of her Bridegroom at the instant of the Incarnation, “He brought me into the cellar of wine.” The saints who comment on this passage tell us that each of our souls, like hers, must descend with him into that cellar where he will say, “Eat, O my friends, and drink, and be inebriated, my dearly beloved.” The saints refer to this as a definite, necessary stage in the spiritual life. Without it, there is no progress toward the Kingdom of Heaven, which is the only goal of the Catholic life, whose only language is music–the etymological root of which means “silence,” as in “mute” and “mystery.” Music is the voice of silence, and so it follows that to enter with Our Beloved Lord into that prayer of quiet and to pray to Our Blessed Lady that He might lead us there, we must learn to speak that language too, that is, we must know music and especially the music of words which is poetry.  – John Senior, The Restoration of Christian Culture



Click the Button to sing the prayer, or play the song in a New Window

Mary Immaculate, Star of the Morning
F. W. Weatherell (1915) Liebster Immanuel
Harmonization by J.S. Bach (1685-1750)
1. Mary Immaculate,
Star of the Morning,
Chosen before the cre-
ation began,
Chosen to bring, in the
light of thy dawning,
Woe to the serpent and
res_-cue to man:
2. Here in an orbit of
shadow and sadness,
Veiling thy splendor, thy
course thou hast run;
Now thou art throned in all
glory and gladness,
Crowned by the hand of thy
Sav_-iour and Son.
3. Sinners, we worship thy
sinless perfection;
Fallen and weak, for thy
pity we plead;
Grant us the shield of thy
sov’reign protection;
Measure thine aid by the
depth_ of our need.
4. Frail is our nature and
strict our probation,
Watchful the foe that would
lure us to wrong;
Succor our souls in the
hour of temptation,
Mary Immaculate,
ten_-der and strong.
5. See how the wiles of the
serpent assail us,
See how we waiver and
flinch in the fight:
Let thine immaculate
merit avail us,
Make of our weakness a
proof_ of thy might.
6. Bend from thy throne at the
note of our crying,
Bend to this earth which thy
footsteps have trod:
Stretch out thine arms to us
living and dying,
Mary Immaculate
Mo_-ther of God.

Chosen by the Eternal Father, outside of time, ex nihilo the idea of the Immaculate Conception, “before” the creation of “the one unworthy of mention” ejected from the throne He places under her feet.
And the temple of God was opened in heaven: and the ark of his testament was seen in his temple, and there were lightnings, and voices, and an earthquake, and great hail. And a great sign appeared in heaven: A woman clothed with the sun, and the moon under her feet, and on her head a crown of twelve stars.
When God revealed this sign in aeviternity to the angels, it was their test, failed by one of three, irrevocably with full foreknowledge and without possible extenuating circumstances.

 


Worship (“worthy-ship”) is best interpreted as “give esteem”. We give adoration, latria, to God alone, we give veneration, dulia, worship, to the Saints–I have seen a stained glass window of John Calvin in Westminster Presbyterian by the California State Capitol–and we give extreme veneration, hyperdulia, to the Blessed Virgin Mary as the creature of God of greater dignity and holiness than all others combined.

Iconoclasts blur these distinctions between the several gradations of piety, despite Adonai’s command to fashion the image of angels on the ark of the covenant, and Adonai’s command in Numbers to set up brass serpents on a pole to be viewed by the people for a cure from the plague punishment for their faithlessness.

Most people who feel scruples that our attention to Mary should not detract from the glory of Jesus, take no account, that it is His own will that we begin our efforts at properly humbling ourselves before Him, by first humbling ourselves to her.



Click the Button to sing the prayer, or play the song in a New Window

THE VIRGIN By William Wordsworth
Arrangement: Devonne Kathy Keevers
Mother! whose virgin bosom was uncrost
With the least shade of thought to sin allied.
Woman! above all women glorified,
Our tainted nature’s solitary boast;
Purer than foam on central ocean tost;
Brighter than eastern skies at daybreak strewn
With fancied roses, than the unblemished moon
Before her wane begins on heaven’s blue coast;
Thy image falls to earth. Yet some, I ween,
Not unforgiven the suppliant knee might bend,
As to a visible Power, in which did blend
All that was mixed and reconciled in thee
Of mother’s love with maiden purity,
Of high with low, celestial with terrene!



Click the Button to sing the prayer, or play the song in a New Window

Immaculate Mary
Fr. Jean Gaignet
(1839 – 1914)

Lourdes Hymn
1. Immaculate Mary, your
praises we sing. You
reign now in Heaven with
Jesus our King.
Chorus
Ave, Ave, Ave, Maria!
Ave, Ave, Ave, Maria!
2. In Heaven the blessed your
glory proclaim; on
earth we your children in-
voke your sweet name.
(Chorus)
3. We pray for our mother, the
Church upon earth,
And bless, Holy Mary, the
land of our birth.
(Chorus)
4. We pray for God’s glory, may
His kingdom come. We
pray for His vicar, our
father in Rome!
(Chorus)
5. Predestined for Christ by e-
ternal decree, God
willed you both virgin and
mother to be.
(Chorus)
6. To you by an angel, the
Lord God made known, the
grace of the Spirit, the
gift of the Son.
(Chorus)
7. Most blest of all women, you
heard and believed, most
blest in the Fruit of your
womb then conceived
(Chorus)
8. The angels rejoiced when you
brought forth God’s Son, your
joy is the joy of all
ages to come.
(Chorus)
9. Your child is the Saviour, all
hope lies in Him: He
gives us new life and re-
deems us from sin.
(Chorus)
10. In grief and temptation, in
joy and in pain, we
turn to you, Mary, your
favor to gain.
(Chorus)
11. Your name is our power, your
virtues our light, your
love is our comfort, your
pleading our might.
(Chorus)
12. In glory for ever now
close to your Son, all
ages will praise you for
all God has done.
(Chorus)
Amen.

Terribilis ut Castrorum Acies Ordinate
(Canticle of Canticles 6:3,9)

Click the Button to sing the prayer, or play the song in a New Window

Feasts of the B.V. Mary.
Catholic Church Hymnal with Music‎ #102, New York, 1905
Mother of Our Lord and Saviour
Te Redemptoris Dominique nostri.
1. Mother of our Lord and Saviour,
First in beauty as in power!
Glory of the Christian nations!
Ready help in trouble’s hour!
2. Though the gates of hell against us,
With profoundest fury rage;
Though the ancient foe assault us,
And his fiercest battle wage;
3. Naught can hurt the pure in spirit,
Who upon thine aid rely;
At thy hand secure of gaining,
Strength and mercy from on high.
4. Safe beneath thy mighty shelter,
Though a thousand hosts combine,
All must fall or flee before us,
Scattered by an arm divine.
5. Firm as once on holy Sion,
David’s tow-er reared its height;
With a glorious rampart girded,
And with glist’ning armor bright:
6. So the’Al-migh-ty Virgin Mother,
Stands in strength for evermore;
From satanic hosts defending,
All who her defence implore.
7. Through the long unending ages,
Blessed Trinity to Thee!
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit
Praise and perfect glory be.
Amen.

Canticle of Canticles 6:3,9
3. Pulchra es, amica mea; suavis, et decora sicut Jerusalem; terribilis ut castrorum acies ordinata. 3 Thou art beautiful, O my love, sweet and comely as Jerusalem: terrible as an army set in array.
9 Quæ est ista quæ progreditur quasi aurora consurgens, pulchra ut luna, electa ut sol, terribilis ut castrorum acies ordinata? 9 Who is she that cometh forth as the morning rising, fair as the moon, bright as the sun, terrible as an army set in array?

Te Redemptoris Dominique nostri


Aurora que Solem paris.

Sweet Morn Thou Parent of the Sun (New York, Catholic Hymn Book, Edward Dunigan and Brother, 1851), arranged to Kingsfold (the theme of Five Variants of Dives and Lazarus by Ralph Vaughan Williams)
Click the Button to sing the prayer, or play the song in a New Window

1. Sweet Morn! thou Parent of the Sun!
And Daughter of the same!
What joy and gladness, through thy birth,
This day to mortals came!
Clothed in the Sun I see Thee stand,
The Moon beneath thy feet,
The Stars above thy sacred head
A radiant coronet.
2. Thrones and Dominions gird Thee round,
The Armies of the sky;
Pure streams of glory from Thee flow,
All bathed in Deity!
Terrific as the banner’d line
Of battle’s dread array!
Before Thee tremble Hell and Death,
And own thy mighty sway:
3. While crush’d beneath thy dauntless foot,
The Serpent writhes in vain,
Smit by a deadly stroke, and bound,
In an eternal chain.
O Mightiest! pray for us, that He
Who came through Thee of yore,
May come to dwell within our hearts,
And never quit us more.
4. Praise to the Father, with the Son,
And Holy Ghost, through Whom
The Word eternal was conceived
Within the Virgin’s Womb.
Be salvation, honor, blessing,
Now and through eternity.
Immortal, infinite sublime!
Older than chaos, space or time!

Click the Button to sing the prayer, or play the song in a New Window




The Eternal Son holds the Immaculately Conceived soul of the Mother at the moment of her Dormition

Click the Button to sing the prayer, or play the song in a New Window





Click the Button to sing the prayer, or play the song in a New Window

Fr. Frederick W. Faber Fr. Charles Raymond-Barker, S.J.
1. Sing, sing, ye Angel Bands,
All beautiful and bright;
For higher still, and higher,
Through fields of starry light,
Mary, your Queen, ascends,
Like the sweet moon at night.
2. A fairer flower than she,
On earth hath never been;
And, save the Throne of God,
Your heavens have never seen,
A wonder half so bright,
As your ascending Queen!
3. O happy Angels! look,
How beautiful she is!
See! Jesus bears her up,
Her hand is locked in His;
O who can tell the height
Of that fair Mother’s bliss?
4. And shall I lose thee then,
Lose my sweet right to thee?
Ah! no—the Angel’s Queen,
Man’s mother still will be,
And thou, upon thy throne,
Wilt keep thy love for me.
5. On then, dear Pageant, on!
Sweet music breathes around;
And love like dew distills,
On hearts in rapture bound;
The Queen of heaven goes up,
To be proclaimed and crowned!
6. On—through the countless stars,
Proceeds the bright array;
And Love Divine comes forth,
To light her on her way,
Through the short gloom of night,
Into celestial day.
7. The Eternal Father calls,
His daughter to be blessed;
The Son His Maiden-Mother,
Woos unto His Breast;
The Holy Ghost His spouse,
Beckons into her rest.
8. Swifter and swifter grows,
That marvelous flight of love,
As though her heart were drawn,
More vehemently above:
While jubilant angels part,
A pathway for the Dove!
9. Hark! hark! through highest heaven,
What sounds of mystic mirth!
Mary by God proclaimed,
Queen of Immaculate Birth,
And diademed With stars,
The lowliest of the earth!
10. See! see! the Eternal Hands
Put on her radiant crown,
And the sweet Majesty,
Of Mercy sitteth down,
For ever and for ever,
On her predestined throne! Amen.

Posted in Music | Comments Off on The Immaculate Conception – O Purest of Creatures – Sweet Star of the Sea

An Irish Love Song – Londonderry Air

Londonderry Air isn’t “O Danny Boy”, that came a decade later, it was originally “An Irish Love Song”.

Would God that I, might be an apple blossom,
that falls and floats, from off the twisted bough,
to find a home, beside your tender blushes,
and gently lie, where lies that blossom now.

Or would I were, a little burnished apple,
for you to gather gliding by so fair,
while shade and sun, your robe of lawn will dapple,
and hide together in your crown of golden hair.

Or, would that I were one among the roses,
that bow to greet you as you float between,
while on the lowest branch a bud uncloses,
to win a smile from you, her lovely queen.

Nay, since I know your hand will ne’er caress me,
I’d be a leaf and on your pathway lie,
if but perchance your snow-white foot might press me,
and so at last to make me happy, though I die.

Click the Button to sing the song, or play the song in a New Window

Posted in Music | Comments Off on An Irish Love Song – Londonderry Air

Let Erin Remember / The Red Fox

Click the Button to sing the song, or play the song in a New Window

Malachi, by tradition, a 9th century Irish king who, defeating one Viking invader, took his gold collar, and another, took his sword. About Loch Neagh, in Moore’s time, it was believed there had been a settlement in a deep dell, which was suddenly and permanently flooded, so that fishermen could later see the battlements of a building down in the water.


In the 1924 Olympics the song was used by Irish athletes in the absence of a national anthem; it has been included in collections of National Anthems, though the Soldier’s Song assumed that position officially. The Irish Guards regiment of the British Army use the song when slow marching.

Posted in Music | Comments Off on Let Erin Remember / The Red Fox

Russian Guitar 1800-1850

Posted in Music | Comments Off on Russian Guitar 1800-1850

Consort Music – Viols & Lutes

Posted in Music | Comments Off on Consort Music – Viols & Lutes

Scarlatti


Posted in Music | Comments Off on Scarlatti

Bach Cantatas

Wie schön leuchtet der Morgenstern, BWV 1 – Annunciation

Ach Gott, vom Himmel sieh darein, BWV 2 – Trinity II

Ach Gott, wie manches Herzeleid, BWV 3 – Epiphany II

Christ lag in Todes Banden, BWV 4 – Easter

Posted in Music | Comments Off on Bach Cantatas

Fitzwilliam, Frescobaldi, Sweelinck

here

Posted in Music | Comments Off on Fitzwilliam, Frescobaldi, Sweelinck

Oxford Carols

Posted in Music | Comments Off on Oxford Carols

Algebra of Musical Tuning Systems

This concise description of the natural errors spawned by several of the more common historical tuning methods, shows the progression of the errors, the simple algebraic relationships among the schisma and commas.

This was hand-compiled without the use of computers, before they were commonly available.

The Math

From prior to the time Common Core Math (vs. old Saxon and new Singapore Math) was calculated to ruin your kids’ numeracy and cyphering on the pre-text that “we have to personally re-discover 2,500 years of math from Archimedes to Gauss”—(on the fallacious assumption that everyone is going on to calculus):

  • (3/2)^12÷2^7 = 3^12÷2^19 [3^12 in the numerator ÷ 2^(12+7)]. That was easy.
  • (3/2)^8÷(2/1)^5×(4/3)^1=(3/2)^8(1/2)^5×(4/3)^1=5×3^8×(5/2^2) [Add the numerators: 1/2^8+1/2^5+1/2^2=8+5+2=15]
  • (3/2)^4÷(2/1)^2÷(4/3)^1=(3/2)^4×(1/2)^2×(3/4)^1 [Add the numerators: 4+2+-2=4]

Both Devonne and I have noticed that electronic keyboard tone scales seem off, “out of tune”. It is the opposite of “ocatve stretching” caused by stiffness in piano strings called inharmonicity, as described in a classic piano tuning theory book. I have a goal of using MIDI or other common electronic music processing to correct this effect, that seems the opposite of “octave stretching”, an actual narrowing-skewing, a compression of the common, electronic keyboard tuning output.

Following is keyboard tuning theory I learned in an acoustics of music, liberal-arts survey course, from a physicist and American Organ Guild member, Dr. Donald Hall at CSUS in the mid-1980s.

The upshot for the problem described above, is that so-called “pure tuning” of simple, pure harmonic intervals, actually sounds awful to our ears when applied as a tuning system, equal temperament is just fine, but if you are going to go to the full extent of establishing your own tuning system, Pythagorean (Claudius Ptolemy’s diatonic ditoniaion, like auto-harp natural tuning) is just fine.

This is in consideration of the practical developments in musical instrumentation: the commonly available electronic keyboard instruments allow for instantaneous tranposition, for practical needs of vocalists; there is progressively less hard-wiring as computer application programs support alteration in tuning schemes; and progressive-popular music at the world music scale increasingly integrates alternate tuning systems with actual music repertoire.

In the illustration, for fifth/V, octave/VIII, and third/III, refer to pure intervals from the harmonic series, 3/2 for V, 2/1 for octave, and 5/4 for III. (4/3 for the interval of a 4th, is not needed–4th+5th=Octave, 4th is subordinate.)

A “cent” (¢) is 1/1,200th of an octave,
the tuning “atom”, the minimal theoretic unit of piano tuning.
It means, the difference between 2 adjacent notes is 100¢.
On your electronic keyboard,  you typically + or – a few ¢
to match another instrument’s tuning so you can play sweetly in tune.

FOLLOW THE CYCLE OF FIFTHS: 12V-7VIII means, start on the lowest C, tune up 12 pure fifths (on some theoretic “organ” with 144 keys), come back down 7 pure octaves. Practically within a single octave on a real keyboard, it means to tune simply up an interval, down an interval, and repeat, like simple harp or autoharp tuning. Start on any C, tune up to G with a pure interval (3:2), down to D (4:3), up to A (3:2), down to E (4:3), up to B (3:2), down to F#, up to C#, down to G#, … “et ceterra”, as Yul Brenner said in Anna and the King of Siam. Or tune down from C to F (3:2 down), up to Bb (4:3 up), down to Eb, up to Ab…and so on.

The chart means, simply adding the error of Pythagorean plus the error of Quarter-Comma Mean-Tone (the commonest pure thirds organ tuning prior to the WTC, a modified form of which it has been convincingly suggested the WTC was actually composed for), yields the error in Equal Temperament.

Ditonic Comma – 12 Fifths minus 7 Octaves
Schisma – 8 Fifths minus 5 Octaves plus 1 Major Third
Syntonic Comma – 4 Fifths minus 2 Octaves minus 1 Major Third

Syntonic Comma
+ Schisma
= Ditonic Comma

Octaves – VIII (12 half steps) – 2:1
Fifths – V (7 half steps) – 3:2
[Fourths – IV (5 half steps) – 4:3]
Major Thirds – III (4 half steps) – 5:4

Posted in Music | Comments Off on Algebra of Musical Tuning Systems